Break it down: Bridge Pose

Bridge Pose: A great posture to undo some of the harm from being seated often and to build hip and core strength

Bridge Pose: A great posture to undo some of the harm from being seated often and to build hip and core strength

Bridge is a great posture to work your hip strength and to release tension in your back muscles. Since most of us spend a significant amount of time on the computer or in seated positions, our backs are usually rounded, causing tightness in our shoulders, back and chest. Here, I will give you some tips for working into bridge along with some fun variations to strengthen your hips, core and to restore your spine.

Sitting like this is terrible, no matter how much you run! Use bridge pose to help undo some of the harm caused from sitting!

Sitting like this is terrible, no matter how much you run! Use bridge pose to help undo some of the harm caused by sitting!

If you have a ponytail, remove it so the back of your head can be flat on the floor. Start laying on your spine with you knees up and your arms down by your sides with your palms down. Your fingers should be able to just barely touch your heels. Keep your feet hip width apart and your knees stacked above the ankles. Consciously make sure your knees do not splay out to the sides. Press into your feet elevating your pelvis off the ground. Now, let go through your glute muscles and allow your knees to remain above the ankles. This is low bridge.

Low Bridge: my feet are hip width apart and I am pressing down into my feet. Lift the pelvis up from the ground and use your core and hip strength to keep you lifted.

Low Bridge: my feet are hip width apart and I am pressing down into my feet. Lift the pelvis up from the ground and use your core and hip strength to keep you lifted.

If you would like to go a little deeper, wiggle your shoulders under you and clasp your hands. This will cause you to lift more through the chest and to intensify the backbend. Again, make sure that you are not tensing in your glute muscles in order to keep your knees in line.

Full Bridge: bring your shoulders underneath you a little and interlace the fingers. The higher you go up, the deeper the backbend you will be in.

Full Bridge: bring your shoulders underneath you a little and interlace the fingers. The higher you go up, the deeper the backbend you will be in.

For a little more core challenge, you can shift your weight over to one leg and lift the opposite. Draw the lifted leg close into your chest with the knee bent and then lift the leg and straighten it into the air. Hold for a few breaths (should get hard pretty quick) and then switch sides.

One Legged Bridge: for some fun, lift one leg into the air by bringing the leg into chest and then straightening it out.

One Legged Bridge: for some fun, lift one leg into the air by bringing the leg into chest and then straightening it out.

For a more restorative version of the posture, grab a block or a stack of books (higher the stack, the greater the backbend will be, so be careful). Place the block close so you can grab it while in the posture. Set yourself up the same way you did before with the knees in the air, feet hip width and your hands by your sides. Lift the pelvis up and grab the block. Slowly, slide it under your sacrum (this should be comfortable, if it is not, move the block around. It should NOT be on your spine). You’ll notice immediately that you can let go of your muscles a bit more and just enjoy the backbend. Have fun with this! Maybe lift one leg at a time, or be super adventurous and lift both!

Supported Bridge: Use your block under your sacrum for a more restorative version of the posture. Remember, the higher you place the block, the deeper you will get into your backbend.

Supported Bridge: Use your block under your sacrum for a more restorative version of the posture. Remember, the higher you place the block, the deeper you will get into your backbend.

When you are done, come back down to the ground and straighten out your legs so you are laying flat for a few breaths. Once you feel ready, draw your knees into chest and hug them in. You can sway side to side to massage the spine. This is a great posture to do before or after your run. Try it out! 🙂 Namaste!!!

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2 thoughts on “Break it down: Bridge Pose

  1. Terry – thanks for the follow. I must say I resemble that little fellow at the computer. I’ll be following your blog to keep myself reminded to stay true to a yoga practice. Thanks. Look forward to seeing more of your posts.

    Like

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